FBI: Huawei lost the coast

You as want, but I will not buy shares of Huawei. And not offer. Why? Still, there are reasons…

While companies demonstrated the latest technology at CES this year, the FBI conducted an operation associated with the world’s second largest smartphone manufacturer.

A small American startup from Illinois, Akhan Semiconductor, contacted the FBI when the company became suspicious that Huawei was trying to steal his intellectual property. After several months of investigation, the FBI has hired the founder of Akhan Adam Khan and chief operating officer Carl Surloff, in order to meet with the leaders of the Chinese giant of smartphones at CES last month for the RAID.

In 2018, Huawei ordered a sample product Akhan Miraj Diamond Glass, a screen that the company calls virtually indestructible. Akhan says it’s 6 times stronger and 10 times more scratch resistant than the Gorilla Glass industry standard. The negotiations have been held since 2016.

In March, Akhan sent a sample of the Miraj to the Huawei test center in San Diego. Huawei had to return the sample within 60 days. Company for the production of smartphones missed the deadline in may and ignored most of the later letters of Achana. In August, Huawei returned a sample of the Miraj, broken in half with missing glass shards.

Suspecting that Huawei was trying to steal his company’s technology, Han contacted the FBI. The Agency became interested in this case and for several months studied e-mails between the two companies and other documents. An FBI forensic gemology expert analyzed the broken sample of Mirage and found that Huawei probably blew it up with a 100-kilowatt laser!

In December of last year, when the FBI began to listen to telephone conversations between companies, Han and Shurboff talked to Huawei engineer Han, who admitted that the sample was sent to China. This revelation put Huawei in a very uncomfortable position, because such actions are in violation of U.S. export laws. The company knowingly violated the International traffic in arms regulations (ITAR), which apply to the exports with military applications. The diamond coating as the products Akhan fall under these rules. Ahan warned Huawei that the company must comply with these rules when sending the sample.

Khan agreed to meet with Khan and Surbiton in Vegas during CES in January. At the meeting, Han and Huawei’s senior purchasing Manager denied that the company had breached the ITAR, and focused the conversation on the future working relationship between the two companies.

A few weeks later, the FBI raided a Huawei facility in San Diego.

Huawei has long been under the hood of the US for fear of espionage. Intelligence officers accused the company of spying for the Chinese government. Last summer President Donald trump has banned the use of U.S. government products of Huawei in connection with the worries about spying on employees of civil service.

Earlier this month in the US, a Chinese phone company tried to steal data that is a trade secret from T-Mobile. Along with this, Huawei has also been accused of violating sanctions against Iran. These charges were brought after the arrest of Huawei’s CFO wangzhou Meng, who faces extradition from Canada to the United States in connection with violations of sanctions against Iran.

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